muse

JAN // Monthly Update

Happy New Year and End of the first month already!

Returning to the site series this new year and hoping to finally wrap up the ‘building’ before starting another set of tests. Series are helpful because it allows me to create a guideline for each test — especially when construction phases are involved. I predict at most two more tests left for the current site series, but won’t deny there may be a new site series to take its place.

Other news on the ideas front, instead of continuing the research into developing the app, I’ve been contemplating more mundane and likely less fruitful things, such as turning my CAT excavator into a pin. I’ve also been contemplating updating the design prior to this venture. Sketches below:

Onwards!

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muse, sketch

JAN // Monthly Update

Hello January. Rather, See Ya January!

It’s the new year, which means ARtifact Lab was on my new years resolutions to keep hacking at. The site series may take a one-test break for an insert test while real-life progress on site gets ready for steel. That being said, here’s some sketches for Test 009 ideas: Last October, I went to check out the local but temporary BIG Serpentine pavilion, here in Toronto to promote Bijarke’s new ‘Habitat’-esque proliferation of housing units across King West. The project is pretty neat, even though it’s quite insane. I also checked out a talk including Bjarke himself, the head of Westbank development, as well as artist Douglas Coupland, longtime friend and collaborator of the two.

I did a pretty early sketch of a simplified test version for the towers back in October, but here’s an update:sketch 009

I have some plans for more interface design options for the coming months in addition to the ongoing Tests. Looking exciting.

In the meantime, here are some links! Only two this week and both from Redshift, which I have been following more regularly.

  1. IoT Technology Will Improve Safety and Efficiency on the Construction Site
    IoT stands for ‘Internet of Things’ — a blanket term that encompasses a number of web-enabled smart tech. The things they can do are pretty neat, I would love to be part of this kind of development.

    “Just like the smart watch senses your daily activities and gives you insights into when you should walk, meditate, or drink a glass of water, IoT on construction sites are also identifying risks before they happen. “

  1. 5 Things the Built World Can Learn From a Filmmaker’s Digital Pipeline
    I was in the entertainment industry for a really brief while, on the computer animation front rather than film making. I think they’re wildly different, but seeing the word ‘pipeline’ sorta strikes at some nostalgia for sure. This one isn’t a long read, worth running through! #3 is so true.

    “The same holds true in the built world, where more refined real-time visualizations and actions can allow decisions to be made earlier and prevent the time-and-cost ramifications of delays.”

That’s all for now, bye!

 

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test

site series // a test 007

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a test 007 –
1 UNIT: space under construction
OCCUPANCY: n/a
TYPE(s): architecture, new building
AR/TIFACT(s): 02

The Cat’s still around busy backfilling the foundation. Slab on grade is in place. Suspended slab formwork is in progress, and the main level peri system formwork boards are getting craned in.

Sitework is progressing way ahead of my tests, but we’re making headway finally! I went to a mini lecture recently where Bjarke Ingels came to Toronto to talk about the new development going up on King West. There is a plan in place to interject my site series with a test from there. Not sure how the numbering will solve itself yet.

Did you see the new ipad pro? The forever question of do I need it vs do I want it.

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muse, sketch

Treading

I have been both busy and tardy about working on my next test as well as keeping up the research. Of course it happens. But I do try to keep up the sketching at the very least, as well as plans for the next tests.

Here’s a sketch of the alternate wework test (from the interior!)

Because of the busy-ness though, I haven’t had too many experiences to provoke thoughts for the next test. The past week I have been reading about neat AR/VR related articles related to construction.

This one is particularly interesting, posted on Redshift, Autodesks’ technology editorial:

“With the combination of where you are with the visual odometry system and what is around you, you know pretty much everything you need to know about the world,” he says. (link)

Did I just do a quote of a quote? In any case, this kind of technology is definitely the direction I want to go. It makes me a bit nervous that all this research and tech is already in development and supported by massive companies like Autodesk. (I wouldn’t be opposed to trying to get my foot in the door.) While the content of this article focuses specifically on use for in-progress construction, I love the idea of being able to ‘see through walls’.

What I imagine with my project is seeing through walls, but not necessarily of pipes and ducts or beams and columns, but neat architectural details and building assemblies that you can’t fully appreciate or admire from the outside. Another issue I would like to tackle is providing this data as information of value to people not involved in the industry so that it can reach a wider audience.

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