muse, sketch

DEC + JAN // Monthly Update

Happy New Year pet project!

The year 2020 has been off to both a rocky and fabulously busy start. I’m stacked up with a ton of todos and commitments, with barely anytime to even enjoy an evening of nothing-ness. Lists gets pushed to the next day which gets pushed to the next week. Sound familiar?

“Is January over yet?”, one friend asks.

Yeah, actually, it is. So here I am with a much delayed monthly update. Thankfully I have something to show for it other than another Test sketch. (I quite enjoy doing those sketches though ^_^).

Before I post that said Test, here are two quick and fun reads that have been on my mind:

  1. How to Design Comfortable and Efficient Offices: Individual Workspaces
    I really enjoy office design. I don’t do much of it at work, but I like looking at well designed office spaces. This was a fun article to browse through, complete with accurate illustrations of different office space typologies
  2. The Art of Kakeibo: This Japanese Budgeting System Could Change Your Financial Life
    This was a light read but seemingly very important and relevant in todays fast-paced, often lose-lose world of money spending more than we save. Apparently there’s a neat trick to go about it. It still requires a good amount of self-control and a motivated mindset to keep at it. All it takes is to know it makes a difference — just like how I’ve decided to transition to plant-based eating thanks to Game Changers.

Seriously though, I have a test in the works. It’s moved past the sketch stage. Update soon. In the meantime, I recently compiled a few of my favourite sketches from my ‘Site Series’ Tests. 05_Artifact_sketch_AM

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muse

wework

I have found that this being an ongoing side project of mine,  the smoothest way for
me to integrate and keep up with it is to draw my tests from real life experiences. Not unlike many of the architecture blogs out there of architects with real full time jobs.

This week, I had a lot of exposure to that global phenomenon that is ’wework’. Participated in a tour of one of Toronto’s first wework offices, listening to a podcast interview with the co-founder (see below), reading many articles about the latest quarterly news on the company…etc.

What does this have to do with my idea? Possibly nothing. But at the same time, thinking more broadly about the project, I want to work on something that can have impact on the multiple streams of architecture, from the urban scale to the interior scale. I have also been quite enamored by ideas of work and office culture – design of the workplace, efficiencies and communities, data driven design – so it has been a fruitful exploration into this so called ‘new’ model of work.

For those of you unfamiliar, WeWork is a co-working startup currently valued at somewhere between $20B and $35B, with almost 400 locations scattered around the world in 69 cities. While WeWork wasn’t the first company to enter the coworking space, they approached it in a very different way, focusing on creating physical environments that connected with workers and business owners, while crafting a culture of super-dedicated members.

interview with Miguel McKelvey, co-founder of wework

I can’t exactly pinpoint how the idea of AR can work congruently with this co-working space model, let alone an office culture setting. The basis of my idea comes from an overlay of information or access to additional information of something in real life. It’s incredibly vague, and the details of that overlay can be anything. So I can’t discount the
connection quite yet. At the same time, the premise of the overlay is to introduce a user base and community interaction, which, as I’ve learned, wework has integrated quite seamlessly into their model.

The best thing to ask then, is how can what I design or helpful to those who choose to use it? And following up, can I move from making it a choice to using it, to encouraging its use regularly in education and knowledge building? In my opinion, it’s not

Test 004 to follow.

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